“Sod the wine, I want to suck on the writing. This man White is an instinctive writer, bloody rare to find one who actually pulls it off, as in still gets a meaning across with concision. Sharp arbitrage of speed and risk, closest thing I can think of to Cicero’s ‘motus continuum animi.’

Probably takes a drink or two to connect like that: he literally paints his senses on the page.”

DBC Pierre (Vernon God Little, Ludmila’s Broken English, Lights Out In Wonderland)

Winner: Booker prize; Whitbread prize; Bollinger Wodehouse Everyman prize; James Joyce Award from the Literary & Historical Society of University College Dublin

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25 March 2012

A DAY ON THE PALMER SCULPTURE HILLS



Photographs by Philip White ... click any image to enlarge it ... To learn more about Greg Johns' amazing sculpture farm on the eastern side of the Mount Lofty Ranges, click here.

Artists are asked to apply to exhibit  in the Palmer Sculpture Biennial. If accepted, they make, deliver and install their works at their own cost.

Top-to-bottom: 


Part of  "Testing Limits"  installation by Jamie Willis with Greg Johns sculpture on horizon ... [ Ed's PS:by Easter, this has become by far the most downloaded photograph on DRINKSTER]

New plantings with Greg Johns sculpture on horizon
 

Sally Wickes "All in One"
 

Chris Ormerod "The Vital Arc"
 

George Andric "Everything Changes, Everything Returns"
 

Stephen Lloyd "Heatwave"

Vast Lichen cities threatened by giant rat-haired scrub


Sandy Mulchay's "Red Chairs" in a paddock near Lake Alexandrina,
from her 2010 Farm Gate artwork installation. The artist on location, 24th March 2012.


Greg said he had 300 visitors through the gate at Palmer the other day.  Big mob for the Badlands, but like even the biggest sculptures, that spooky landscape just eats 'em up.  It's no country for old men.  Since he took all the stock off it, that hard rain shadow ground is beginning to re-produce a rich range of native grasses. 

The last snap of the day is back on the troubled Murray-Darling estuary on the flats below, but further south, between Langhorne Creek and Clayton. It looks bonnie, but microbiologically, the estuary's a mess of itinerant refugee  bugs getting flushed out of the eastern third of Australia by the extreme and insistent la niña flood pattern of recent years. Lake Albert's still seven times the salinity of seawater and the e-coli concentration in the River mouth has once again shut down the pipi, (or Goolwa cockle) mollusc fishery along the beaches outside.

The Murray needs more Greg Johns' Sculpture Water washing down her!

"Meeting's Over: Safe and Sound, High and Dry Inside the Lectric Fence",  is dedicated to the Murray Darling Basin Authority.  But that's my naming. It is actually Sandy Mulchay sitting in the remnants of her Red Chairs installation from the year before last.  Suddenly, there she was, sitting in the chairs nobody's yet pinched, with that cool short-arse rainbow squeezing some feed out of the last dim rays. 

Another perfect day well had by experts.


8 comments:

blackie said...

No vines Whitey?

Philip White said...

the odd lectrik one, sure

Kate said...

eerily beautiful, I need to go sit in these bad lands.

Philip White said...

go sit ... give it time ... this is the landscape i came to from the wet cold climate rainforest mountains of east victoria in 59 ... i was south down the range from here, other side of the bremer ... these old rocks, and the inextricable mysteries that lie beneath, have hypnotised me all my life ... the skyscape to the east, over the irrigated mallee vineyards, is a good indicator of the weather some eastern folks got in vintage 12

Jilbob said...

I am beside myself that I missed this entirely... never saw anything bout it... it's my favorite trip ever, damn. I'm hoping he'll be opening it up again for SALA, as usual...? Thanks for the excellent photos, though Philip... Annabelle?....

Philip White said...

I have a reality challenge. See the second image, the photograph of Greg Johns' needle looming behind his new native shrubs? What's that line-up of fractals that extends from the installation's base to the photographer's right knuckle?

Jude said...

Blake Prize for the bottom one whitey. Magdalen after the clambake.

Anonymous said...

Where's Peter Andrews when you need him?