“Sod the wine, I want to suck on the writing. This man White is an instinctive writer, bloody rare to find one who actually pulls it off, as in still gets a meaning across with concision. Sharp arbitrage of speed and risk, closest thing I can think of to Cicero’s ‘motus continuum animi.’

Probably takes a drink or two to connect like that: he literally paints his senses on the page.”


DBC Pierre (Vernon God Little, Ludmila’s Broken English, Lights Out In Wonderland ... Winner: Booker prize; Whitbread prize; Bollinger Wodehouse Everyman prize; James Joyce Award from the Literary & Historical Society of University College Dublin)


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02 February 2012

JACKSON FAMILY DOUBLES YANGARRA


BARBARA BANKE WITH HER FAMILY (L-R) JULIA JACKSON, BARBARA, CHRISTOPHER JACKSON AND KATIE JACKSON

PRESS RELEASE:
JACKSON FAMILY WINES  BUYS AUSTRALIA’S CLARENDON ESTATE VINEYARDS

A legendary wine estate goes to one of the world’s great winemaking families

CLARENDON, MCLAREN VALE, SOUTH AUSTRALIA -- Jackson Family Wines Chairman and Proprietor Barbara R. Banke today announced the purchase of Hickinbotham Vineyard at Clarendon in South Australia’s McLaren Vale wine region.

“There are few properties in the world like that of the legendary Hickinbotham Vineyard at Clarendon,” said Barbara Banke.   “My family and I have had great affection for Australia - so much so that we purchased a beautiful viticulture property in Kangarilla, McLaren Vale, a decade ago.  We named this Yangarra Estate Vineyard, and are proud of our additions to its original 1946 plantings. 

“As premium viticulturers and winemakers, the Jackson Family has always respected Australia as home to some of world’s finest vineyard estates.  We are delighted to have this opportunity to purchase one of its greatest, and play an ongoing role in its protection and progress,” Barbara Banke said.

The Hickinbotham Clarendon Vineyard has grown grapes for internationally acclaimed wines, including Penfolds Grange, Eileen Hardy and Clarendon Hills. It is comprised of more than 186 hectares (approximately 455 acres) of land, and is renowned for its elite Shiraz, Grenache and Cabernet Sauvignon. It was established in the modern era by the Hickinbotham family, whose patriarch Alan Robb Hickinbotham was the founding father of Australian Oenology education.

“When we learned that the Hickinbotham Clarendon Vineyard (above) was available, we were more than interested,” says Banke.  “The Hickinbotham family is well known for their commitment to producing the highest quality grapes with a great reverence for the land — these principles are our passion and driving force.  I’m very proud that we can count this jewel as the newest Jackson Family Estate Vineyard and look forward to continuing their celebrated legacy.”

Steeped in history, this estate began in 1858 as one of the first higher elevation vineyards in South Australia.  It sits on the coveted 750 million year old geology of the Belair Subgroup in the north-eastern corner of McLaren Vale, overlooking the perfectly-maintained stone buildings of the 1850s Clarendon village. Traditional dry-grown vines sit side-by-side with modern irrigated vineyards on the 250 metre slopes. 

There are two important architectural elements on the property: a Chateau-inspired main house built by the Hickinbotham family, and the famed “Earth Shelter House” designed and built by German architect Gerhard Schurer in 1981. These distinctive dwellings offer stunning views of the vineyards and will be used as hospitality houses for guests.


THE FIRST VINTAGE AT YANGARRA ESTATE'S BRAND NEW WINERY AT KANGARILLA, McLAREN VALE, SOUTH AUSTRALIA, IN 2010. LEFT TO RIGHT: WINERIES BY DESIGN MD, GERALD ASBROEK, JACQUES BLAIN, CO-INVENTOR OF THE VAUCHER BEGUET MISTRAL GRAPE SORTER, AND PETER FRASER, GENERAL MANAGER AND WINEMAKER AT YANGARRA

“I have always admired the history and the sheer beauty of the Hickinbotham Vineyard at Clarendon,” said Yangarra Estate manager/winemaker Peter Fraser. “It’s very exciting to finally have a hand in taking this property to a new level.  As it’s only a few minutes from the new Yangarra Estate winery, we can confidently guide its special flavours into wines of style and clarity.

“In the ten years I have worked with the Jackson Family, I have had nothing but admiration for their commitment to distinctive and historical vineyards,” Peter Fraser continued. “Since the late Jess Stonestreet Jackson (February 18, 1930 – April 21, 2011), founded the business in 1974, Jackson Family Wines has consistently worked to establish top-shelf estate wines that the customer can trust and respect.”

Jackson Family Wines representative Katie Jackson -- daughter of Barbara Banke and founder Jess Jackson (below) -- is spearheading the integration of this revered property.  “I’m honored to be a part of the Clarendon Vineyard tradition,” said Katie, “particularly so because it is an estate rooted in the same strong family tradition that makes Jackson Family Wines such a unique company.”   


(... continuing DRINKSTER's habit of printing verbatim releases that nobody else in the Australian wine press has picked up, like Tuesday's announcement from Wine Australia, which some of them finally seemed to read ... )



6 comments:

jealous said...

Cornering the grenach market?

Philip White said...

Subscribers to the Australian Daily Wine news should be suss of the provenance of the yarns this agency flips on. They could have run the accurate story above, yesterday morning, as distributed by the Jackson Family at 0900 CST, but instead refused to publish until they read what Harvey Steiman had to say on the link they chose: http://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show/id/46340 Harvey got a few bits of it wrong. Funny old world.

Alison said...

Championing the fact that some of SA's finest vineyards are being gobbled up by international owners again? I'm not sure I agree with the over the top chocolate syrupy spin on this post... More high performance wine producing vineyards lost overseas, if this story is correct, and probably something to be wary of more than celebrating.

original kangarilla said...

Wow Alison! Do you whiteys have a astrological sign for racism? I dont know what star you are, but I bet youre a perfect example of it! That land belongs to the Kaurna, if it blongs to anybody other than those who just paid good hard earned for it. Whos land did you steal?

Alison said...

Who presumed I'm a 'whitey'? Why? Not expecting an 'indigenous fella' to be hanging around a Philip White wine blog? Who's really showing stripes of racism here?

Philip White said...

You should both reveal your true identities and contact details.